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Poster: jonc Date: Aug 27, 2009 1:59pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Short Feature Films

I think the screenplays of some of those "B" movies were written or selected just for that purpose. The triple features were replaced by television, though. People no longer spent their full day at the theater.

"My personal comment on this: I don't think more than an hour is an absolute necessity to tell most stories. A lot of movies today are just too long, IMHO. Give me the old, short b-features any day."

You wouldn't want to see Citizen Kane crammed into a 60-minute synopsis, would you? Or Chinatown? Schindler's List? Can you imagine how much splicing that would take?

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Poster: jonc Date: Aug 27, 2009 2:06pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Short Feature Films

I did watch Hangover recently, and that could have been cut considerably. It's only 90 minutes, but it drags on the same joke throughout. I found myself getting bored after an hour.

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Poster: cosmicolada Date: Aug 27, 2009 3:02pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Short Feature Films

Today's filmmakers could learn some valuable lessons (about pacing, if nothing else) from old b-movies.

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Poster: cosmicolada Date: Aug 27, 2009 2:46pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Short Feature Films

I'll get out the splicing block, ASAP! ;-)

About 30 years ago (in the early days of commercial home video) a friend and I experimented with tightening a few feature films using two VCRs, and we ended up with movies going from 2+ hours down to 60-75 minutes. I know other filmmakers who purposely pad their films to lengthen the running time, as if a longer run time means a film is somehow better or more important.

One of the best films on the whole IA in my opinion is "Silent Snow, Secret Snow," which runs 17 minutes.

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Poster: jonc Date: Aug 27, 2009 4:36pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Short Feature Films

I suppose most films have periods that seem kind of dull or insignificant, but these scenes give contrast to the more intense action or drama scenes, and magnify their effect. Hangover, on the other hand, tries to be funny throughout, and the joke just starts to get stale.

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Poster: cosmicolada Date: Aug 27, 2009 7:22pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Short Feature Films

I think it just comes down to personal preference. I've always favored a film that tells its story with swift economy, hits the main points, wraps it up, and gets out. Not a requirement for me, but it sure helps a lot. I was just curious if anyone felt the way I do or has a similar preference for these shorter feature films.

Edit: A perfect example of a short feature that is among my top few favorite films is Roger Corman's 1957 Not Of This Earth, which runs only 64 minutes in the theatrical cut. (It was padded to 67 minutes for TV syndication later on.) Most Corman fans (Cormanites?) usually mention this film as one of his best. Also, the original versions of Bucket of Blood and Little Shop of Horrors (among his most popular) were in the 65-minute range as well.



This post was modified by cosmicolada on 2009-08-28 02:22:28